Monday, July 10, 2017

Visitors Guide to Redcar, Coatham & Saltburn - GM Tweddell 1863

In 1863, Stokesley born Radical, Printer Publishers, Poet, Chartist and People's Historian - George Markham Tweddell published a Visitor's Guide to Redcar, Coatham and Saltburn, of which, the original version is dowloadable free here on Google Books in pdf form.

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1LsHAAAAQAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false

Tweddell often went by the pen name of Peter Proletarius or Clevelandus etc. Here is a poem by Tweddell on Redcar, to be found in the book, assigned to Peter Proletarius.


REDCAR.
"Redcar! upon thy firm, smooth sands I love
 To loiter in the pleasant Summer time,
 When Phoebus drives his fiery wain aloft,
 And zephyrs waft the fragrance of the vale,
 Mix'd with the coolness of old Ocean's breath,
  Acceptable alike to youth and age,
 Joy to the hale, and healing to the ill.
  See what a fleet of vessels gaily glide,
 Like graceful swans, upon the glassy sea,
 Bringing the riches of each foreign land
 In happy exchange for our industry.
 Another day, perchance on angry waves
 These ships will toss; grim Neptune in his rage,
 Like raving madman, striving to destroy
 All that hath taken years of toil to make.
 But now in calm the sea-god seems to sleep,
 And Cleveland's maidens in the limpid waves,
  Bathe their fair limbs, as Dian did of old;
 Whilst the sands sparkle, as with diamonds strewn."

Peter Proletarius


The fascinating history of George Markham Tweddell and his poetess wife Elizabeth Tweddell, better known as Florence Cleveland can be read here. Florence was known for her Dialect poetry - Rhymes and Sketches and recently  Stockton duo, who have made a big impact on the folk scene and in the press, recorded an album named after one of Florence Cleveland's dialect poems Take Thy self a Wife. The poem was written over a hundred years ago and they have made the poem into a song  - listen to it on You Tube -



READ more about the Tweddell's here - http://www.tweddellhistory.co.uk/

And George Markham Tweddell's collected poetry here http://www.tweddellpoetry.co.uk/

The introduction to his poetry and to his work can be read here http://georgemarkhamtweddell.blogspot.com/